The cutover to the new ODBL license will occur on April 1st. Details are still being worked on, but there is much to do if we want to avoid having gaping holes in the map when contributions of those who declined the new license are removed.
The first step is to use tools like the GeoFabrik Inspector and Cleanmap to see if your area of the country is ok. More on how to do that in a moment. If your area needs work, then Toby Murray has some good tips here: .
If your area is clean, then head over to the talk-us@openstreetmap.org mailing list and see if anyone is asking for help. If you area needs massive amounts of work, you may want to head over to talk-us@openstreetmap.org and ask for help.
Now, about determining what work needs to be done:
The GeoFabrik Inspector shows nodes and ways that are at risk. Here’s an example from Salt Lake City Utah, where I’m lending a hand with I 15 right now: http://tools.geofabrik.de/osmi/?view=wtfe&lon=-73.80515&lat=42.74861&zoom=14&opacity=0.46&overlays=overview,wtfe_point_modified,wtfe_line_modified_cp,wtfe_line_modified,wtfe_point_created,wtfe_line_created_cp,wtfe_line_created
Red indicates nodes and ways created by someone who has not agreed to the new license; yellow indicates nodes and ways edited by someone who has not agreed.
Cleanmap is also useful, it has Cleanmap and Badmap base layers which allow you to see the map as it will become, and what’s at issue. http://cleanmap.poole.ch/?zoom=16&lat=40.71374&lon=-111.9033&layers=B00
If you are a JOSM user, then the history dialog is very helpful; for a selected object, it will give a history of edits and indicate whether an editor has accepted, declined, or simply failed to acknowledge the license change.
The JOSM license change plugin is useful too: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/JOSM/Plugins/LicenseChange

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